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  1. This is where I will post my cosplay tutorials. I will shortly post my White Mage tutorial. However, I am currently redoing that costume, so I can't post everything. Good News is that this will allow me to take more pictures. Cosplay: Final Fantasy White Mage Robe Temporary photo until I'm done with my robe... again Materials: - White fabric* - Red fabric or red fabric paint* - Stitch/Seam ripper (in case of mistakes) - Pins - Sewing machine - Tailor's chalk - Fabric scissors or cutter - Cardboard - Spool of White thread - Spool of Red thread - Measuring tape *Note: Before I get started on the procedure, I just want to address the fabric length and type. Notice I did not say what type for each. That is because it is all up to you. Look at the multiple fabrics that the store has to offer and pick which one you like best. For me, I got heavyweight for my white fabric (this the main part of the robe) and broadcloth for my red fabric, which is for the triangles. For the length of each fabric, it all depends on your size. Due to my size, I got 5 1/2 yards of heavyweight and 3 yards of broadcloth. There was still a lot left over when I was finished. Extra is good, however, because you can make things with the extra fabric, which I will make tuts for later. Procedures: - Basic: These are things you should do before you start cutting and sewing. 1. Wash and iron the fabric. I actually ignored this rule, even though it's Sewing 101 2. Take all of your measurements (i.e. height, arm length, shoulders, waist, torso, hips, bust, etc.) - The Robe: This part is for the robe (without the hood and sleeves). 1. First thing you want to do is take your height and apply it to the white fabric to you. Basically, take your height, double it, and then cut that from fabric (not the exact number, but close to it). So, if you are 5' 5", that doubled is 11' 10". So out of the fabric you bought, you would cut about 3 - 3 1/2 yards (9 - 10.5 ft). 2. Fold in half, so the width is the same, but the length is cut in half. 3. Fold it the other way, so the width is now cut in half. 4. Next, take your shoulder width measurement and cut it in half. Measure that out onto the fabric and mark it with the tailor's chalk. Draw a line from that mark to the bottom. This is so that it flares out at the bottom. 5. Cut along that line. (Caution: before cutting, make sure the line was drawn on the side that isn't folded.) 6. On the top of the side that is folded, cut a quarter of a circle. This is where your had will go, so make sure that is will be big enough to get your head through. If not, you can always cut more of it later to make it big enough. 7. Unfold the fabric. It should look like this: 8. Hem the bottom of the robe. The hem can be has big or small as you want. Just be sure to test to see how far past your feet it goes. If you want it to where it drags on the ground, before that the material is sturdy enough so if you step on it, it wont rip. If it is a material that isn't very tough, I suggest you hem it to where it doesn't go past your feet. 9. Not it's time for the triangles, the most annoying and time consuming part of this costume. Now, you can make the triangles at big or small as you want. Just make sure they fit comfortable on the bottom. Best way to do this is to take the measurement of the bottom and then divide it by the number to want at the triangles' base or how many triangles you have. If the bottom measures out to be 48" (96" all the way around) and you want 8 (16 triangles total) triangles on both sides, that means the triangles will need a base of 6". However, I suggest that you make the triangles for the bottom of the robe bigger than 6". My triangles on the bottom had a base of 8". 10. This is where the cardboard comes in handy. Measure how big you want the triangle to be onto the cardboard and then cut it out. Then trace the cardboard triangle onto the red fabric using the tailor's chalk. For this, I suggest you fold the fabric, so you are cutting multiple triangles at a time. Something like this: I didn't have tailor's chalk at the time, so I used marker... not a good idea. 11. Cut the triangles out and then pin them to the bottom. Like so: 12. Sew the triangles on. When you sew them, I suggest using the zigzag stitch, so the raw edges don't fray. 13. After you sew on the triangles, flip the robe inside out, so that way you can pin the sides. Before sure to leave room at the top for the sleeves. I would say leave about 15"-16" at the top for the sleeves, since they will be long and flared out. Of course, you can make adjustments due to your own preferences. 14. When you are done pinning the sides, flip back so the right side is out and put is on. Make sure that it's comfortable and easy to move in. Some fabrics don't stretch very much or not at all, so fit is' too tight, move the pins closer to the edge. 15. Once you are done pinning the sides to where they are comfortable, you can due one of two things. You can go ahead and sew the sides, or keep them pinned and start working on the sleeves. I suggest the latter if this is your first cosplay costume. Trust me, sewing on sleeves is almost as bad as the triangles.
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